[Analysis] Terril Welch – FARM IN FOG

[Analysis] Terril Welch - FARM IN FOG

This is part analysis and part assessment.

This painting, fittingly titled the ‘Farm in Fog’, created on a 16×20″ gesso-board with a wood cradle, is quite a rousing piece of Impressionism.
The brush work is very reminiscent of Monet’s ‘The Summer, Poppy Field’ and ‘ Boy Fishing’ by Roy C. Nuse.

The painting describes a scene from a rural area. Free from the urban distortions of nature. We see only a single rooftop surrounded in trees, mist and grass with noticeable frozen dewdrops. The far background in hidden is mist – the contents hidden inside – undefined.

There is heavy fog, and hence low values of contrast. The color palette here seems very limited, I can remark on Burnt Umber, Olive Green, Prussian Green, Titanium White and Venetian Red. An expanse of ‘space’ is created by having a sparse foreground, with only the grass in proper focus and the rest of the trees and that one lone house out-of- focus ( although, paintings are meant to have everything in focus, and not photographic, with focus in the center and blurring out at the edges); hence, the use of ‘Impressionism’ for this has a dual effect, the scene and if interpreted with more ‘reality’, the background receding out of focus.
The use of rough dry brushes, has given it an aged look. As if, it is a painting from one’s vintage collection. The distortions and the ‘age’- make this painting ever more beautiful and sophisticated.

The vibrancy here is not created with color complements, but with the scene itself – regardless of the matte paints. The scene itself is fresh and alive with foliage – and nature. The blades of the grass flutter in the icy cold wind – even in this chill, ‘life’ and ‘nature’ is effervescent.

I recommend anyone who want to bring a splash of freshness into their living-room, to view it in detail ( and consider ordering it at: http://www.artsyhome.com/product/Farm-in-Fog )

Advertisements

Dystopia

Dystopia

Created by Ibrar Yunus [ Spiffy ]
Dystopia
Digital Paints
_________________
Titled as Dystopia ( Dark state, environmental-urban deterioration), a total of 3 and a half hours were spent in completing this digital painting. As always I used PaintToolSAI for this, as I wanted blending to be natural (as oil paints are). The idea for this came, after I came across a selective color painting by some artist on Facebook; his/her painting also used purple palette and I felt a sense of ‘royal’ and ‘dream-like’ feelings being emitted by that. Perhaps the fixed emotion ( not happy nor sad ) contributed to some extend to this, but the contrasting background (dark purple behind right purple) promoted this. So moving on, I chose ‘blending’ over ‘contrast’ as it gives ‘softness’ to the painting; even when bright or very dull colors are used. In my paintings i have noticed that colors them selves dont make a painting bright or dull; but they are relative on each other, a painting that uses very bright colors can appear very dull indeed, if the palette doesnt use any contrast.
The ‘figurative’ and ’emotional’ nature of this painting tell us about ones need to go out once in a while and ponder over the apparent darkness of a busy/crowded/mechanized place. This does not mean that darkness exists everywhere, but the thoughts of a ‘young’ mind about one’s survival in the ‘Practical World’. A scene depicting the time of the dawn is shown, as this is the time when the cold breeze brushes against you and one is fresh and ready to go out and then stop! ‘think about whats more to come?’. The butterfly depicts hope, and works as to counter the darkness of the city behind and the painting itself. The orbs add to the lightness of the sky (even though the sky is ‘in’ the background); this is a visual indication that ‘don’t look down and be frightened, keep your hopes high, look up! up at the bright sky; there are surely better things to come!’

As Étoile Bleue, the shades of purple here show ‘dream-like’ presence.
________________________________

This concludes the detail analysis by the Artist himself. You are welcome to interpret this in your own way. 🙂